The woman in black theatre review

The woman in black theatre review

Elderly Arthur Kipps brings a ghost story to a young actor; it's the story of something that happened to Kipps 30 years earlier, and the actor turns it into a drama. Ken Drury , who plays Arthur Kipps in the West End production, relishes the recent memory of a man who gasped "Fuck's sake! Yet both, he says, "scared the living bejaysus out of the audience — and that's the main thing". He has even hired a young actor Brown to rehearse with him and liven up his delivery. Whilst I could see most of the stage, I felt fairly cut off from the action, and I missed some moments that were played far upstage. As he delves deeper into the mystery surrounding this woman, Kipps uncovers her secret with horrific consequences. The story is engaging, packed with interesting, eccentric English characters, and contains enough jump scares to keep an audience on the edge of its seat. Fox also plays multiple characters and the wonderfully written play within a play adaption allows for this easy transition. There are no lines, and dance experience is preferred.

The play-within-a-play conceit works well eventually, but we first have to get through nearly twenty minutes of exposition, as Kipps hems and haws over whether he can cope with reliving the horrors of his story.

Playwright Stephen Mallatratt adapts the novel for the stage by adding a play-within-a-play element. Mallatratt, who spent most of his writing life contributing material to British TV shows like Coronation Street and The Forsyte Saga, is overly fascinated with the process of theatricalizing words—and thinks his audience is too.

Meanwhile, the clever, meta-theatrical framework sweeps the audience up into the magic — reminding us how little is required, besides imagination, to set a scene.

does the woman in black come into the audience

On the night I attend, the Fortune is full of screaming year-olds, but the play is easily capable of terrifying older viewers, too. When sent to settle the estate of the recently deceased Alice Drablow, Kipps comes face-to-face with the woman in black, whose appearance strikes dread into the heart of this remote village on the coast of England.

Sadly, Mallatratt did not get to see it, having died in So what makes The Woman in Black so frightening?

Theatre royal woman in black

This is also a show where much depends on strong lighting and sound design; Kevin Sleep lighting and Rod Mead sound do not disappoint. Based on the novel by Susan Hill, this is a fine example of mystery theatre at its shock-producing best. It is now one of the longest-running plays in British theatrical history, currently celebrating its silver anniversary with a parallel national tour. Able to deliver an emotional roller-coaster from various comedy moments to being utterly frozen in fear, Spencer uses his exceptional skill to woo the audience into the story… and a false sense of security. At this gala performance, director Robin Herford and producer Peter Wilson mounted the stage during the curtain call to explain the interesting history of the plays journey to the Fortune Theatre, pointing out and thanking original investors and asking the mutiple previous cast in attendance to stand for a round of applause. When sent to settle the estate of the recently deceased Alice Drablow, Kipps comes face-to-face with the woman in black, whose appearance strikes dread into the heart of this remote village on the coast of England. Like the novel, the play is narrated by an elderly man named Arthur Kipps Armacost , who has written an account of something dreadful he experienced years before. Running time: 2 hours. The actor assigns himself the part of the young Kipps while casting the real Kipps as all the other characters in the story. Meanwhile, the clever, meta-theatrical framework sweeps the audience up into the magic — reminding us how little is required, besides imagination, to set a scene. Bluff, good natured and slightly obtuse, like so many horror story protagonists, Kipps embarks on this adventure without the slightest hesitation. Although everyone involved in The Woman in Black believes it will run and run, it has a long way to go before it catches up with Agatha Christie's The Mousetrap , which has been in the West End for 60 years.

The small cast another plus for a producer looking to contain expenses provides actors with plenty of opportunities to chew the scenery.

As a result, it takes a while to become engrossed in the tale, but the play picks up the pace considerably once both characters are fully immersed in the plot. Advertisement The actor turns out to have a strong directorial vision, far more elaborate than anything Kipps imagined, involving costumes and lighting and sound effects and actual acting.

Rated 8/10 based on 27 review
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